Tag Archives: global

Welcome to Anytown, America! [Your Ad Here]

As reported by Mark J. Miller on brandchannel and the New York Times, many American cities are getting creative to earn more cash. 

How can you drum it up when everybody is also paying extra close attention to where a wallet’s contents are disappearing to? Cities are no different. Government services are hurting for cash and there are only so many ways to generate more dough.

Baltimore is currently trying to sell space on its fire engines to raise some extra pennies. And why not? The city’s current budget has made the elimination of three city fire companies necessary this summer.

Philadelphia is selling ad space on its subway fare cards and one of the city’s main train stops is now named for AT&T. Chicago is selling naming rights to its eleven “L” subway stations. As for the Times’ hometown, the naming rights for the Atlantic Avenue subway station at the new Barclays Center in Brooklyn were sold in 2009, and the MTA implemented the Barclays name change in May.

The NYT report adds that corporate brands can cause confusion to the good citizens navigating them: “Cleveland recently named its new Bus Rapid Transit system the HealthLine after it received $6.25 million over 25 years from the Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals. (‘The HealthLine is not a number to call for free medical advice, any more than Quicken Loans Arena is where you go to take out a loan,’ its website notes.)”

The paper notes that KFC was one of the leaders in this form of advertising. The company “temporarily plastered its logo on manhole covers and fire hydrants in several cities in Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee after paying to fill potholes and replace hydrants.” Sounds like not the worst tradeoff, right?

“As I’ve looked at budgets, they get bigger with less support from the federal and state governments,” Baltimore City Council member William Welch said. “And we can’t tax people out of existence. We’re trying, our mayor’s trying, to bring 10,000 more people back to Baltimore city. And if you have an increasing fee or tax structure, you’re not going to be able to do that. So you have to create alternatives.”

The Times notes that while selling naming rights raises money, it can also raise some thorny issues as well. The town of Tyngsborough, Mass., was considering selling ad space in order to raise money for new police cars, but it ended up deciding to not go there just yet. “Because of what we do, we like to be neutral,” said Chief William F. Mulligan, according to the Times. “Say there were two shopping plazas, and one advertised and one didn’t. Would that company feel like we weren’t treating them fairly?”

UK vs. US: British and American Chefs Go Head-to-Head

As reported by BBC Worldwide, British and American chefs go head-to-head in a race from LA to NYC to win $100,000 with Jamie Oliver as Executive Producer of Chef Race: UK vs. U.S.

The new original unscripted series (10 x 60) follows sixteen chefs, eight Brits versus eight Americans, as they race across the United States from Los Angeles to New York City in hopes of winning the $100,000 prize.

Throughout the journey the chefs are accompanied by Michelin-starred London Restaurateur Richard Corrigan (Masterchef), who serves as a mentor and judge, and host Claire Robinson (5 Ingredient Fix). With no money and minimal resources, the chefs must rely on more than their cooking skills. Resourcefulness, ingenuity, leadership and finesse will be just an important on their 3,000 mile adventure.

Jamie Oliver, Executive Producer, Fresh One says: “The restaurant business is one of the toughest in the world and to be successful in it these days takes so much more than just being able to cook. You’ve got to have a good business sense, vision, leadership and so much more. This series is the first time that anyone has really dug deep into what it takes to be successful and it’s going to take an incredible individual to win it.”

Perry Simon, General Manager, Channels, BBC Worldwide America adds: “Chef Race: UK vs U.S. celebrates great chefs from both sides of the pond, bringing their best cooking and entrepreneurial skills to bear in a creative format that showcases the diversity of America. The show is a great fit with our BBC America brand and our slate of new original series.”

Chef Race: UK vs U.S. is a BBC AMERICA original series and will be produced by Jamie Oliver’s Fresh One Productions, with Jamie Oliver (Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution), Amy Chacon (The Amazing Race), Stef Wagstaffe (Undercover Boss), Roy Ackerman (Reagan, Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution), Sebastian Grant (Lilly Allen and Friends) and Jo Ralling (Jamie’s American Road Trip) serving as executive producers.

Chef Race: UK vs U.S. is the latest commission to join BBC AMERICA’s stable of all-new original programming, along with scripted drama Copper debuting on Sunday, August 19.

Letter from America: Bonuses, Bungs and Brand

What common factor do Barclays, WPP, BP, RBS, NewsCorp and Costa Crosiere share?  As in my Market Leader magazine article (June 2012), they’re all under the spotlight by US shareholders for brand damage as a result of misjudged bonuses, ethics or operational bungles which has lost them the trust they invested so heavily to earn.  Read the full article here below…

Two leading British banks, Barclays and RBS, each awarded significant payouts to their executives despite calls not to by American institutional investors.  Both Bob Diamond at Barclays and Fred Goodwin, formerly of RBS Citizens, had significant US operations under their purview yet seemed deaf to the costs to their brands in one of the world’s largest financial services markets.  The Occupy Wall Street movement, which triggered copycat sit-ins in London and other leading financial centres, should have sent signals that this new form of grass roots consumer activism is not just temporary grit in the oyster but a more permanent reflection of the assertion by American consumers of their right to choose listening brands.

American owners of WPP stock are now less enamoured with the business’s remuneration committee proposal that Sir Martin Sorrell enjoy a 500% of salary maximum bonus payout from only 300% in times of austerity for its American clients and consumers.

Others with European operations affecting their American operation is News Corporation, whose leaders Rupert and James Murdoch have appeared before Parliament and a Government-backed enquiry.  During this time, NewsCorp’s headquarters offices in New York City has enjoyed 24/7 protesters in front of its doors while the company aims to explain to American institutional investors and customers its ethical standards and allegations of phone hacking and police bribery in Britain.

Then of course there’s the Costa Concordia cruise disaster whose European executives infrequently explained the vessel’s sinking off the Italian coast, owned by the world’s largest cruise line, American brand Carnival (ironically named given the circus surrounding its media management).

And we all know the story of Mr. Hayward wanting his life back 2 years ago while Gulf coast shrimpers wondered when their livelihoods would return too.

What all share is the significant loss of trust from its American investors and customers as a result of not understanding the context, culture and communications needed to save their sinking reputations.  According to the Edelman Trust Barometer 2012, an annual study from this PR firm examining levels of trust in companies and industries by geographic market, there’s a lot of ground to make up by these European companies there.  When asked “how much do you trust business to do what is right?” only 50% of the American respondents gave their trust.

So what are the implications on Europe-based Messrs. Murdoch, Diamond, Sorrell, Hester, Hayward and Foschi to regain trust from US consumers and shareholders?

— communicate the “how” – have your leaders volunteer information about how decisions are made, the rationales which incorporate the views and values of those constituencies, assuming you’ve tested those rationales first to find the connections (if there aren’t any, you’d better find some);

— identify the “who” – fielding top executives to rebuild trust is a must for customers, staff, investors, media and all the other stakeholders.  First though, make sure these leaders have the agility and cultural awareness to deliver their messages the American way (we want emotion, hand-wringing, even tears rather than stoic Anglo-Saxon methods);

— show us the “what” – demonstrate action which plays to Americans’ preference for “ready/fire/aim” approaches rather than fence-sitting deliberation.  Show your plan for regaining their trust, what contingency plans you’ve put in place, how you’ll implement the plan, how you will engage them;

— be clear about the “where” – decide which online and offline media you will use to keep these US publics informed about and aligned with your plan of activities.  Which of your ecosystem partners are included in your communication? Which have credibility in the US that add to your message, and which detract?

While American trust is no different that British, Italian, French or Japanese trust, how you go about rebuilding it does depend on understanding the place.  Doing your homework on what works well there does pay huge dividends as many international brands in the US have learned the hard way.

7 tips for 2012: Retail Rescue Recipe for Recession

Andrew Climance, Retail & Leisure International Editor, posed the question “Can internationalism in a recession be done?” and my below response was published in the March 2012 issue.

Despite one of the worst global recessions on record in developed economies, retailers in these countries are still planning for growth by expanding into international markets, which might at first seem a counter-intuitive strategy.

In fact, it’s one of the smartest things they can do in order to spread their risk across a number of markets of varying volatility. Tracking many trans-Atlantic retail moves, I have noted many top US and UK brands looking to further expand their reach across the water, some of which include Crate & Barrel, J Crew, Reiss, Victoria’s Secret, Abercrombie Kids, Orla Kiely, Coach, L K Bennett, Tory Burch and Patagonia.

While many others are sure to follow, they will all need to avoid being on the long list of trans-Atlantic retail casualties by taking a professional approach which includes adapting cleverly to the cultures and shoppers in their new geographies.

Over the many years helping retailers successfully transplant and translate their brands into US and EU markets – something I call BrandTravel™ – I’ve concluded that one of the most critical capabilities is developing and executing an intentional and methodical approach to internationalisation. With so many examples of retailers and leisure brands who have paid a high reputational price when getting it wrong, those who do approach expansion professionally do earn huge rewards.

So here are 7 tips for 2012 to help ensure your retail brand is fit for purpose in the international arena:

1. Manage “local” and “global” – managing this dilemma well separates the winners from the mediocre. It is possible to obtain scale economies while delivering local services and ranges as global food and drink brands have learned so well. Zara is amongst the very few in the fashion world who have created ranges specifically for their southern hemisphere markets rather than just selling them past season’s wares from its northern stores.

2. Transfer knowledge – opening stores in another market is not enough without also transferring what’s been learned from the culture, consumer behaviours and preferences in each market to ensure innovation and profits follow. Tesco’s Fresh & Easy small store US format had some costly merchandising hiccups at the start as a result of not applying the localisation lessons gathered from its expansions into Asian markets.

3. Be resilient – Being able to change processes, designs and manage costs in turbulent climates is a skill to be implemented by operations teams and the retail business leaders. Some setbacks are to be expected as part of the process of aligning the business to local cultures and tastes.

4. Assume difference – Checking assumptions about the target culture is a must, as BestBuy, Starbucks, Disneyland Paris and many others have learned at great cost. Starbucks recently attempted to market its Trenta size (30 oz) drink in the UK, larger than a full bottle of wine, which was seen as an overly-indulgent American “supersized” product not fit for European tastes. However, Coach only brought its US leather goods ranges to its recently-opened Bond Street store that it knows would appeal, leaving behind the “wristlet” (a small zip wallet with a carrying strap for the wrist) that is so successful in its home market.

5. Innovate through insight – Involve consumers and supply chain partners to identify which new technologies, materials, designs, services and mistakes can change the business model. Crowdsourcing not only lowers the R&D costs but engages your target markets with the knock-on benefits as they use social media to boast about your foresight and engagement.

6. Build the brand – Most consumers don’t know many of the soon-to-land-here trans-Atlantic brands… yet. Seize the opportunity to (re)position the retailer in a new geography, as Abercrombie & Fitch so successfully has in the UK. Without preconceived ideas of the company, that blank canvas gives permission to seize a space you might not seize in your domestic market. Victoria’s Secret, the mass market lingerie brand, will soon be launching in the UK with the chance to position itself with new customer segments.

7. Assume success – Approach new markets intentionally – not just by licensing or franchising but having it as part of the long-term strategy. Too often, expanding businesses treat their international growth as a “project” rather than as a core part of their long-term evolution, choking the initiative of critically-important capital and leadership resources. Knowing the international foray will pay off, based of course on research evidence which supports it, means such activities are properly funded and given the management attention they deserve.

Instead of the constant stream of headlines about brands that have not succeeded overseas, let’s replace those with some success stories about the companies that have done it right, that have been methodical, that have adapted and made great profits.

Internationalisation in a recession obviously can be done – it just takes some planning and will.

Chilean Miners: Recap of my BBC Breakfast Interview

As I discussed this morning in my BBC TV Breakfast interview, the successful rescue of the 33 miners is a welcome respite from the otherwise depressing news about economic turmoil, banker bonuses, paltry pensions and property prices.  What is key once the miners have had a chance to process all they’ve experienced, is that they get good advice about any marketing opportunities that are presented to them.  It’s not beyond the realms of possibility that life insurance, beer, personal hygiene manufacturers amongst others approach them to endorse their brands.  No doubt the William Morris agency is already on-site to secure movie and TV rights for their amazing story which might bring them at least a financial cushion on the back of the horrendous trauma they’ve experienced and the fact they are now all unemployed.  The happy ending in any case is one that delights everyone, regardless of where in the world they are.

An unexpected benefit I suggest is Chile’s country brand is now much more favourably viewed than before the miners were rescued.  It demonstrated to the world it can manage expectations (having told the media it would be Christmas at the earliest before the miners are rescued) and projects, having engineered the rescue capsule flawlessly and ahead of schedule.  Hopefully their inward investment team are working overtime to capitalise on this unexpected success and showcasing of talent.

Spotlight on America | In-Depth Analysis | Marketing Week


International Marketing Partners Director Allyson Stewart-Allen’s 2001 book Working with Americans highlights, among other things, that even though British and American culture is linked through history and language, key differences in approaches to business are worth understanding. She also revealed in her recent session with the Marketing Week-sponsored Marketing Academy that Americans put less importance on relationships but are more task-focused, and want to see numbers-based results and insights over qualitative commentary.

For Nicole McDonnell, marketing director of children’s food brand Ella’s Kitchen, cultural differences in her team’s personality in the US has been very obvious and unexpected. She gives the example of company job titles – Nicole’s business card says “head of making friends”, and the company managing director is Ella’s dad, and his job title is simply that. McDonnell feels this adds to the brand identity, but it has not gone down well with her colleagues on the other side of the Atlantic.

“In the States, it’s all about being the CEO or the vice-president. I would like them to use the job titles we use because they epitomise what the brand is about, but in the US they feel it doesn’t give them enough credibility in their market,” she explains. “I appreciate the titles we like to use might not give the right understanding of how senior somebody is, so getting the right balance on this is something we are in discussions about.”

Diageo’s Cristina Diezhandino, now regional marketing and innovation director for Africa, also discovered some key differences when she embarked on her first role in the US about 15 years ago. First, that the customary greeting of kissing a business colleague in Spain was not appropriate in the US. Second, that meeting formats were a lot stricter than what she was used to.

“Meetings had a set beginning and end, stated in advance, with specific agendas and an outcome to be achieved in that time. What surprised me was that people would simply stand up at the end of the period of time, say goodbye and leave.

“I now regard that as very normal, but when I first experienced it I thought it was not a polite way to end things. Then I realised that it is equally impolite to take up more of people’s time than necessary when they are very busy.”

 

Click here to read my comments in Marketing Week’s  cover feature: Beware the culture gap on global growth trail

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HOW READY ARE YOU TO WORK WITH THE WORLD?

HOW READY ARE YOU TO WORK WITH THE WORLD?

Today Wednesday, 8th September, I’m leading the Marketing Academy’s Faculty for its International Marketing curriculum.   The Marketing Academy provides a great forum for industry leaders, marketing gurus, academics, entrepreneurs and marketing practitioners to inspire, develop and coach an entire generation of future business leaders.  This is an overview of the program highlights I’ll be covering in my half-day seminar:

How Can You Win in Overseas Cultures?

To hit the ground running – saving yourself time, money and embarrassment while you build your overseas client base and networks – you must be fluent in the business cultures of your overseas business partners if you’re going to be an effective business developer.

Whether you’re encountering these other business cultures while traveling the globe or at your desk via e-mails, this highly-practical and relevant help gives you actionable information about yourself and your international colleagues’
business practices and cultures, making you a more fluent corporate diplomat.  The objective: to enable you to succeed in the ambiguous, unsettling and diverse international business environments which you are now targeting.

This program is based on the principle that understanding the environments and contexts in which international business partners operate develops executive citizen diplomats who can operate successfully while representing their companies and their countries.

Marketing Academy Programme Objectives

  • to reveal how individual behaviours/actions affect the perceptions of executives in a variety of other business
    cultures
  • to provide participants with frameworks, insights and tools to be able to create action plans and directly apply the
    learning to their business activities
  • to offer participants insights necessary to create effective communication within international colleagues and/or team
    members
  • to reduce the levels of stress, frustration and conflicts based on simple misunderstandings
  • to deliver valuable knowledge concerning what makes other business cultures “tick”
  • to raise the probability of building long-term, profitable business relationships that are fruitful and lead to the
    achievement of business and professional goals
  • to help participants begin the learning journey toward being true global diplomats

Format

This ½ day Marketing Academy interactive session is infused with small group activities to provide frequent opportunities for the Marketing Academy Scholars to share personal experiences, ask questions and try out ideas and new behaviours in a safe and confidential setting.  The process is engaging, fun, experiential and effective.

The Scholars will be working in small groups to actively debate and network while expanding their global business competence.

The Scholars will apply a variety of learning methods and materials during this “Working with the World” programme while exploring first-hand, real-life examples of business situations to clarify the concepts presented.

Session topics include:

  • What are “global mindsets” and “business cultures”?
  • Models to describe business cultures
  • Managing cross-cultural dilemmas
  • Role plays: Communicating across cultures
  • Leading complex international teams
  • Assessing and developing your global mindset

Learning Techniques

  • Lively presentations of core material
  • Question and answer sessions
  • Large group discussions and small group exercises and report-backs
  • Learning workbook including copies of the presentation materials

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